Canadian Women's Struggle for Equality

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Women inequality in Canada dates back to the British American Act (BNA) of 1867 which became the Canadian constitution foundation. The main shortcoming engraved in the BNA was the entire removal of rights of women. Here women were barred from taking part directly in public life. As a consequence women were sidelined in public life.

In a period exceeding one decade ago, women in Canada came up with groups, pulling together with the purpose of attaining a degree of civic fairness for them and their families. They argued that that they made significant every day contribution to society. Therefore they ordered for rights similar to ones possessed by men. The family obligations accomplished by women and the civic rights ordered by women to take part in politics fashioned an energetic traction along which subsequent women’s organizations sailed upon. However the order for same rights as men has been the characteristic of women’s organization that stood the test of time despite receiving constant opposition.

Up to 1946 the rights to cast a vote by women in an election were not present and their nationality was traced through either the father or husband. The provisions in law at the time took way the right of franchise as well as citizenship to any woman that enters into matrimony with a non-British man. Women in marriages were required to depend upon their spouses for provision and were barred from looking for jobs or engaging in income generating activities. In the 1960s women were allowed to take part in elections. However it was the number of women candidates who successfully acquired seats were few and therefore a few women could be found both in the judiciary and legislature. In addition an ideology that only through motherhood could women acquire status was being advanced by allowing only married women to access birth control. Through these deeds women were demoted to the role of by consistently being sidelined in other aspects of the society. Inequality was also present in marriage too. This is shown in the 1973 ruling of a case in which a woman by the name Irene Murdoch who had built a ranch together with her husband in Alberta was notified of no right to lay any claim on the land by a certain judge. Historic events in which women took part such as the 1st and 2nd World War presented an opportunity to women to grow economically enhancing their rights.

Persons Day celebrates the commemoration of the 1929 Edwards v. Canada case, in which women were identified to be “qualified persons” under the British North America Act of 1867. Prior to this women had acquired the right to cast a ballot in federal popular vote but by 1918 they were deliberately being barred from some political organizations like the senate by the status of “qualified persons” being withheld. The five Albertan women, referred to as the Famous Five, achieved success through a tough fight for equality for Canadian women subsequently presenting opportunities for women to vouch for rectifications resulting to equality. Some states gave women the right to cast votes in municipal elections by virtue of being property owners despite the fact that whether this provincial suffrage automatically won women a chance to cast a vote in the federal elections was being debated by the Canadian parliament.

The law to allow women federal suffrage started being effected in January 1919. The Dominion Elections Act of 1920 on top of giving women a chance to cast a ballot in the federal election also allowed women to participate as candidates. The law however had a number of shortcomings one of them being that it discriminated against women from certain ethnic minorities. It also did not scrap all provincial disparities. However the progress in the women rights is attributed women involvement in the 1st world war. It was after the 1st World War that women were allowed to serve as commissioned military officers and even allowed to seek elective posts to the federal parliament and hold public office. Women soldiers played various roles but participated in the 2nd World War as soldier but they were underpaid as compared to their male counterparts. It took considerable effort to convince the military brass to adhere to equal treatment of military women with military men. In the political arena despite having only two women representatives in the House of Commons in 1939, there was an increase in the number of women actively taking part in the main political parties and electoral debate.

The subsequent struggles that followed after the 2nd World War focused on other areas such as family planning and abortion. These efforts bore fruit in the year 1969 in which abortion was legalized. Courageous women continued advocating for increased chances for women in institutions of higher learning and equal treatment at the work place. In the current world an increased number of women have joined both formal and informal employment. However with the domestic roles such as giving care to children continue straining women who are in the job market. Though some issues such domestic violence and disparities in pay for equal job done still persist in the world of women today, the mile stones made by women in fighting for their rights are evident through persistence.

The subsequent struggles that followed after the 2nd World War focused on other areas such as family planning and abortion. These efforts bore fruit in the year 1969 in which abortion was legalized. Courageous women continued advocating for increased chances for women in institutions of higher learning and equal treatment at the work place. In the current world an increased number of women have joined both formal and informal employment. However with the domestic roles such as giving care to children continue straining women who are in the job market. Though some issues such domestic violence and disparities in pay for equal job done still persist in the world of women today, the mile stones made by women in fighting for their rights are evident through persistence.

Women inequality in Canada dates back to the British American Act (BNA) of 1867 which became the Canadian constitution’s foundation. The main shortcoming engraved in the BNA was the entire removal of rights of women. Here women were barred from taking part directly in public life. As a consequence women were sidelined in public life. In a period exceeding one decade ago, women in Canada came up with groups, pulling together with the purpose of attaining a degree of civic fairness for them and their families. They argued that that they made significant every day contribution to society. Therefore they ordered for rights similar to ones possessed by men. The family obligations accomplished by women and the civic rights ordered by women to take part in politics fashioned an energetic traction along which subsequent women’s organizations sailed upon. However the order for same rights as men has been the characteristic of women’s organization that stood the test of time despite receiving constant opposition.


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Up to 1946 the rights to cast a vote by women in an election were not present and their nationality was traced through either the father or husband. The provisions in law at the time took way the right of franchise as well as citizenship to any woman that enters into matrimony with a non-British man. Women in marriages were required to depend upon their spouses for provision and were barred from looking for jobs or engaging in income generating activities. In the 1960s women were allowed to take part in elections. However it was the number of women candidates who successfully acquired seats were few and therefore a few women could be found both in the judiciary and legislature.

In addition an ideology that only through motherhood could women acquire status was being advanced by allowing only married women to access birth control. Through these deeds women were demoted to the role of by consistently being sidelined in other aspects of the society. Inequality was also present in marriage too. This is shown in the 1973 ruling of a case in which a woman by the name Irene Murdoch who had built a ranch together with her husband in Alberta was notified of no right to lay any claim on the land by a certain judge. Historic events in which women took part such as the 1st and 2nd World War presented an opportunity to women to grow economically enhancing their rights.

Persons Day celebrates the commemoration of the 1929 Edwards v. Canada case, in which women were identified to be “qualified persons” under the British North America Act of 1867. Prior to this women had acquired the right to cast a ballot in federal popular vote but by 1918 they were deliberately being barred from some political organizations like the senate by the status of “qualified persons” being withheld. The five Albertan women, referred to as the Famous Five, achieved success through a tough fight for equality for Canadian women subsequently presenting opportunities for women to vouch for rectifications resulting to equality.Some states gave women the right to cast votes in municipal elections by virtue of being property owners despite the fact that whether this provincial suffrage automatically won women a chance to cast a vote in the federal elections was being debated by the Canadian parliament.

The law to allow women federal suffrage started being effected in January 1919 (Uneke, 2014). The Dominion Elections Act of 1920 on top of giving women a chance to cast a ballot in the federal election also allowed women to participate as candidates. The law however had a number of shortcomings one of them being that it discriminated against women from certain ethnic minorities. It also did not scrap all provincial disparities. However the progress in the women rights is attributed women involvement in the 1st world war. It was after the 1st World War that women were allowed to serve as commissioned military officers and even allowed to seek elective posts to the federal parliament and hold public office.

Women soldiers played various roles but participated in the 2nd World War as soldier but they were underpaid as compared to their male counterparts. It took considerable effort to convince the military brass to adhere to equal treatment of military women with military men. In the political arena despite having only two women representatives in the House of Commons in 1939, there was an increase in the number of women actively taking part in the main political parties and electoral debate.

The subsequent struggles that followed after the 2nd World War focused on other areas such as family planning and abortion (Dawson, 2013). These efforts bore fruit in the year 1969 in which abortion was legalized. Courageous women continued advocating for increased chances for women in institutions of higher learning and equal treatment at the workplace. In the current world an increased number of women have joined both formal and informal employment. However with the domestic roles such as giving care to children continue straining women who are in the job market. Though some issues such domestic violence and disparities in pay for equal job done still persist in the world of women today, the mile stones made by women in fighting for their rights are evident through persistence.

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